Sunday, January 25, 2009

Sonic Generator Concert

If you're wondering where you can see a quartet of iPhones performing John Cage, music for saxophone and tape delays by Terry Riley, paranoid cheese miniatures by Marc Mellits, and more, look no further! The next free performance by Sonic Generator, Georgia Tech's high-tech chamber-music ensemble in residence, is coming up on Monday, February 2nd at 8 pm at the Georgia Tech Alumni House.

For full details, see the Sonic Generator web site or the Facebook event page.

See you there!

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Fanfare 36 by Atlanta Composer and Flutist Kelly Via

Sunday, January 25,2009 at 3:00 at Snellville United Methodist Church, 2428 Main Street East, Snellville, GA. 30078 The Atlanta Music Academy Flute Choir will perform "Fanfare 36" by Atlanta Composer and Flutist Kelly Via. Program consisting of works by Burnnet, Holst, Lauf, Molnar-Suhajda, Nourse, and Smetana. The concert is free and open to the public.

"Fanfare 36" was written for and premiered by the 2008 National High School Flute Choir at the 36th Annual Convention of the National Flute Association in Kansas City, MO. The NHSFC was composed of 25 high school flutists selected by audition from across the U.S. Inspiration for the piece was drawn from the honor of being selected to conduct these talented young flutists as well as my love for marching bands and DCI. "Fanfare 36", published by Nourse Wind Publications, is scored for two piccolos, four C flutes, two alto flutes, bass flute and optional contrabass flute."

Here's a little about Kelly Via:

Kelly Via received the Bachelor of Music from Drake University and the Master of Music from East Carolina University. He is the piccoloist with the Atlanta Ballet Orchestra and Macon Symphony Orchestra. A flute choir enthusiast and arranger, Kelly has been selected to perform with the National Flute Association Professional Flute Choir each year since 2000. Several of his arrangements and compositions for flute choir are available through Nourse Wind Publications. One of his arrangements was named a winner in the NFA 2002 Newly Published Music Competition and another was a finalist in 2004. Most recently he was appointed to serve as Flute Choir Coordinator for the NFA from 2007 to 2012 and he conducted the NFA National High School Flute Choir in 2008. Kelly is currently teaching flute and directing flute choirs at Mercer University, Agnes Scott College and the Atlanta Music Academy.

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Akhnaten, Philip Glass, and the Atlanta Opera

Just in case you didn't know, Akhnaten is sold out. However, us composer people may be interested in some of the events surrounding the staging of the opera. If you ever heard Philip Glass speak, you know he makes for a knowledgeable and interesting speaker on living a life as a composer. Here's some events you might be interested in, all are free and open to the public at Emory University:

January 22, 2009 7:00 PM
Carlos Museum

Dr. Melinda Hartwig, Associate Professor of Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology at Georgia State University; Dr. Shalom Goldman, Professor of Middle Eastern Studies; and Richard Kagey, Stage Director of The Atlanta Opera’s production of Philip Glass’s Akhnaten discuss the historical figure of Akhnaten, the Akhnaten of the imagination in Glass’s opera, and the artistry of The Atlanta Opera’s production.


January 25, 2009
3:30 PM
Glenn Memorial

In celebration of the 25th anniversary of the opera, composer Philip Glass will have a public conversation about Akhnaten with Emory professor of Middle Eastern Studies Dr. Shalom Goldman. Dr. Goldman served as an Egyptological advisor to Glass and wrote part of the opera’s libretto using ancient Egyptian sources.


January 26, 2009
4:00 PM
Carlos Museum

From Twyla Tharp to Robert Wilson to Yo-Yo Ma, Composer Philip Glass has collaborated with artists across the disciplines. In a conversation with Secretary of the University Rosemary Magee, Glass discusses the ways that collaboration informs his own creative process.


January 26, 2009
6:30 PM
White Hall Room 208
Composer Philip Glass introduces a screening of Martin Scorsese’s film Kundun, which traces the life of the 14th Dalai Lama, and hosts a discussion of the influence of Tibetan music and Buddhism on Glass’s score for the film and other work.

Map of the Emory Campus can be found here: http://map.emory.edu/

Thursday, January 08, 2009

Sergei Eisenstein’s groundbreaking movie ¡Que viva México! with a new commissioned film score by Atlanta composer Brian Mitchell

Bent Frequency presents ¡Que viva México!

On January 31, 2009 at 8:00 p.m. at Kopleff Recital Hall at Georgia State University, contemporary music ensemble Bent Frequency will present a unique multimedia experience: Sergei Eisenstein’s groundbreaking movie ¡Que viva México! with a new commissioned film score by Atlanta composer Brian Mitchell. Written for a small ensemble of flute, violin, guitar and percussion, Mr. Mitchell’s score is the perfect compliment for this hauntingly beautiful film and will be performed “in real time” during the movie by members of the ensemble. Of the score, Linda Dubler, Curator of Media Arts at the High Museum states:

"Finally, ¡Que viva México!'s exquisite black and white imagery has a fitting accompaniment in composer Brian Mitchell's subtle, understated score. Its inventive orchestration and many moods, ranging from the lyrical to the melancholic to the joyous, bring a dynamic, contemporary sensibility to this unfinished masterpiece."


The viewing will be preceded by a brief lecture from Dr. Gregory Smith, Associate Professor of Communications at Georgia State University.


Tickets prices are as follows:
General admission - $10
Non-GSU students with ID - $5
GSU students, faculty and staff with ID – Free

For more information visit bentfrequency.com
This event is sponsored in part by CENCIA

Monday, January 05, 2009

Coalescence and Accessible Contemporary Music

My string quartet, Coalescence, was recorded by an group in Chicago called Accessible Contemporary Music. ACM plays a piece of music every week by a living composer. I highly recommend submitting a piece. They put together a stellar performance for me:

http://www.acmusic.org/weeklystreaming.html