Sunday, November 28, 2010

Philippe Leroux lecture at Georgia Tech

In addition to coming to Tuesday night's free Sonic Generator concert at Woodruff Arts Center, I encourage you all to come see Philippe Leroux's lecture at Georgia Tech tomorrow (Monday), where he'll discuss his piece Voi(Rex) that is on Tuesday evening's program.


GA Tech's "C3: Creativity, Cognition and Computation" series and the Center for Music Technology Seminar Series present:

Philippe Leroux, University of Montreal and IRCAM

Voi(Rex) the model of the model

Monday, November 29, 2010
TSRB Auditorium: directions and parking info at http://www.tsrb.gatech.edu
reception at 1:30 pm
lecture at 2:00 pm

See you tomorrow (and Tuesday)!

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Student Composer Concert

You are cordially invited to come by and enjoy a FREE concert given by the Georgia State University Student Chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI)


Date: Friday, November 19 
Time: 12 PM 
Location: Kopleff Recital Hall


PROGRAM:

Taylor HELMS / Modal Dances for woodwind quintet - [premiere]

John PAPASPYROU / Eight Little Sketches for Viola - [premiere]

Chris OWENBY / Wondrous Love for soprano & piano trio 

John PAPASPYROU / Epitaphios for tenor sax. & cello - [premiere]

Taylor J. GLANTON / Latin Bridge Suite for piano trio - [premiere]


For directions and more information, please visit www.music.gsu.edu. We hope to see some of you there!

Sonic Generator Concert with Philippe Leroux

Georgia Tech’s chamber music ensemble-in-residence, Sonic Generator, will feature the music of guest composer Philippe Leroux in a free performance in partnership with the Woodruff Arts Center and France-Atlanta 2010. The concert also features guest soprano Donatienne Michel-Dansac and compositions by Kaija Saariaho and Pierre Jodlowski.

Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at 8 p.m.
Rich Theatre, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree Street
free admission, reception to follow

Full details at:
http://www.sonicgenerator.gatech.edu

Hope to see you there!

Sunday, November 14, 2010

Eddie Horst's Passing

I am sorry to share the news that Eddie Horst died on Thursday. He took his own life after struggling with clinical depression. He is survived by his wife and two children.

Many of you remember Eddie from the monthly composer meetups he hosted at Crawford Communications a few years back. Others of you probably know him in others ways too. He had far reaching connections in the music industry and touched many people's lives. He was very supportive of the Atlanta Composers mission to network local composers.

If there is a public memorial, I (or one the blog authors) will post details when they become available.

If you would like to share your positive remembrances of Eddie, please do so in the comments.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Albert Einstein and Rabindranath Tagore

After a few words about order and causality, a meeting of minds on music.

Below is an excerpt from a conversation between poet Rabindranath Tagore and physicist Albert Einstein, which took place in a meeting arranged by a mutual friend ("Dr. Mendel") on August 19, 1930. Fascinating that a considerable portion of their exchange is about music. It is taken from "Three conversations: Tagore Talks with Einstein, with Rolland, and Wells" (Asia Magazine, March 1931). This was a second meeting and conversation between Einstein and Tagore. The photo by Martin Vos was taken during their first encounter on July 14 of the same year. [Image source: Wikimedia Commons]


TAGORE: I was discussing with Dr. Mendel today the new mathematical discoveries which tell us that in the realm of infinitesimal atoms chance has its play; the drama of existence is not absolutely predestined in character.

EINSTEIN: The facts that make science tend toward this view do not say good-bye to causality.

TAGORE: Maybe not, yet it appears that the idea of causality is not in the elements, but that some other force builds up with them an organized universe.

EINSTEIN:
One tries to understand in the higher plane how the order is. The order is there, where the big elements combine and guide existence, but in the minute elements this order is not perceptible.

TAGORE: Thus duality is in the depths of existence, the contradiction of free impulse and the directive will which works upon it and evolves an orderly scheme of things.

EINSTEIN: Modern physics would not say they are contradictory. Clouds look as one from a distance, but if you see them nearby, they show themselves as disorderly drops of water.

TAGORE: I find a parallel in human psychology. Our passions and desires are unruly, but our character subdues these elements into a harmonious whole. Does something similar to this happen in the physical world? Are the elements rebellious, dynamic with individual impulse? And is there a principle in the physical world which dominates them and puts them into an orderly organization?

EINSTEIN: Even the elements are not without statistical order; elements of radium will always maintain their specific order, now and ever onward, just as they have done all along. There is, then, a statistical order in the elements.

TAGORE: Otherwise, the drama of existence would be too desultory. It is the constant harmony of chance and determination which makes it eternally new and living.

EINSTEIN: I believe that whatever we do or live for has its causality; it is good, however, that we cannot see through to it.

TAGORE: There is in human affairs an element of elasticity also, some freedom within a small range which is for the expression of our personality. It is like the musical system in India, which is not so rigidly fixed as western music. Our composers give a certain definite outline, a system of melody and rhythmic arrangement, and within a certain limit the player can improvise upon it. He must be one with the law of that particular melody, and then he can give spontaneous expression to his musical feeling within the prescribed regulation. We praise the composer for his genius in creating a foundation along with a superstructure of melodies, but we expect from the player his own skill in the creation of variations of melodic flourish and ornamentation. In creation we follow the central law of existence, but if we do not cut ourselves adrift from it, we can have sufficient freedom within the limits of our personality for the fullest self-expression.

EINSTEIN: That is possible only when there is a strong artistic tradition in music to guide the people's mind. In Europe, music has come too far away from popular art and popular feeling and has become something like a secret art with conventions and traditions of its own.

TAGORE: You have to be absolutely obedient to this too complicated music. In India, the measure of a singer's freedom is in his own creative personality. He can sing the composer's song as his own, if he has the power creatively to assert himself in his interpretation of the general law of the melody which he is given to interpret.

EINSTEIN: It requires a very high standard of art to realize fully the great idea in the original music, so that one can make variations upon it. In our country, the variations are often prescribed.

TAGORE: If in our conduct we can follow the law of goodness, we can have real liberty of self-expression. The principle of conduct is there, but the character which makes it true and individual is our own creation. In our music there is a duality of freedom and prescribed order.

EINSTEIN: Are the words of a song also free? I mean to say, is the singer at liberty to add his own words to the song which he is singing?

TAGORE: Yes. In Bengal we have a kind of song-kirtan, we call it-which gives freedom to the singer to introduce parenthetical comments, phrases not in the original song. This occasions great enthusiasm, since the audience is constantly thrilled by some beautiful, spontaneous sentiment added by the singer.

EINSTEIN: Is the metrical form quite severe?

TAGORE: Yes, quite. You cannot exceed the limits of versification; the singer in all his variations must keep the rhythm and the time, which is fixed. In European music you have a comparative liberty with time, but not with melody.

EINSTEIN: Can the Indian music be sung without words? Can one understand a song without words?

TAGORE: Yes, we have songs with unmeaning words, sounds which just help to act as carriers of the notes. In North India, music is an independent art, not the interpretation of words and thoughts, as in Bengal. The music is very intricate and subtle and is a complete world of melody by itself.

EINSTEIN: Is it not polyphonic?

TAGORE: Instruments are used, not for harmony, but for keeping time and adding to the volume and depth. Has melody suffered in your music by the imposition of harmony?

EINSTEIN: Sometimes it does suffer very much. Sometimes the harmony swallows up the melody altogether.

TAGORE: Melody and harmony are like lines and colors in pictures. A simple linear picture may be completely beautiful; the introduction of color may make it vague and insignificant. Yet color may, by combination with lines, create great pictures, so long as it does not smother and destroy their value.

EINSTEIN: It is a beautiful comparison; line is also much older than color. It seems that your melody is much richer in structure than ours. Japanese music also seems to be so.

TAGORE: It is difficult to analyze the effect of eastern and western music on our minds. I am deeply moved by the western music; I feel that it is great, that it is vast in its structure and grand in its composition. Our own music touches me more deeply by its fundamental lyrical appeal. European music is epic in character; it has a broad background and is Gothic in its structure.

EINSTEIN: This is a question we Europeans cannot properly answer, we are so used to our own music. We want to know whether our own music is a conventional or a fundamental human feeling, whether to feel consonance and dissonance is natural, or a convention which we accept.

TAGORE:
Somehow the piano confounds me. The violin pleases me much more.

EINSTEIN: It would be interesting to study the effects of European music on an Indian who had never heard it when he was young.

TAGORE:
Once I asked an English musician to analyze for me some classical music, and explain to me what elements make for the beauty of the piece.

EINSTEIN:
The difficulty is that the really good music, whether of the East or of the West, cannot be analyzed.

TAGORE: Yes, and what deeply affects the hearer is beyond himself.

EINSTEIN: The same uncertainty will always be there about everything fundamental in our experience, in our reaction to art, whether in Europe or in Asia. Even the red flower I see before me on your table may not be the same to you and me.

TAGORE:
And yet there is always going on the process of reconciliation between them, the individual taste conforming to the universal standard.

# # #

Footnote for composers: 1930 was the year in which Nicholas Slonimsky premiered Charles Ives's "Three Places in New England," a year which also saw the premieres of such disparate works as Howard Hanson's "Symphony No. 2," Anton Webern's "Quartet, Op. 22," and Kurt Weill's "The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny." It was also the year when the Marx Brothers' film "Animal Crackers" was released. --mg

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Will Eyedrum Go Out with a Bang?

Financially troubled arts-alternative Eyedrum will close its current location, as its lease expires Dec. 31 and will not be renewed. Read the article by Chad Radford in this week's Creative Loafing (online now, on the street soon): http://clatl.com/atlanta/will-eyedrum-go-out-with-a-bang/Content?oid=2309057

Monday, November 08, 2010

24 Hour Opera Project

We had a blast this weekend making operas in 24 hours with the Atlanta Opera! Here's a link of the beginning of the competition in case any of you may be curious about applying next time:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XD6lUin2igc&feature=youtu.be


If you have a facebook account you can view all three operas here:

http://www.facebook.com/video/?id=1387344038

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

November 7th: Bent Frequency and Ballet Preljocaj

On Sunday, November 7th at 4:00pm in the lobby of the Rialto, the Atlanta-based new music group Bent Frequency will be collaborating with the innovative Ballet Preljocaj and the Rialto for this event by sharing their expertise on the music of John Cage for this performance. Founding member and percussionist Stuart Gerber will be giving a brief introduction to Cage and his work at the beginning of the program. For a more in-depth look at Cage’s music, Bent Frequency will present a few short pieces from various points in Cage’s career at the reception in the Rialto lobby before the Ballet Preljocaj performance of Empty Moves. We will explore Cage’s sound world through works for saxophone, trumpet, percussion, amplified cacti, and conch shells!

The program includes:

Inlets (1977) for 12 conch shells
Variations I (1958) (a duo version for saxophone and trumpet)
Composed Improvisation for Snare Drum (1975)
Water Walk (1959)

It promises to be an adventurous evening!

Ballet Preljocaj’s performance begins at 5pm in the Rialto Center for the Arts. Information about tickets can be found here.

Bent Frequency presents the New York-based Amp New Music Ensemble - TWICE!

Hi all -

You have TWO chances to catch some innovative saxophone and electronic music this weekend:

Friday, November 5 · 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Kopleff Recital Hall Georgia State University
FREE


Amp New Music will be presenting “Amplified: Saxophone and Electronics” with Saxophonist Michael Ibrahim. This program will include music by Grisey, Chion, Mirza, and Stockhausen.


Saturday, November 6th, 8PM
Eyedrum (290 MLK Dr. SE)
$7/students=$5


We will be miking the big drum out front! It will be played before and after the main program. Double-header of new/experimental classical music by Atlanta locals Bent Frequency hosting New York-based Amp.

Bent Frequency

Bent Frequency brings the avant-garde music tradition to life in Atlanta through adventurous programming, the promotion of New Music, and a creative synthesis of music and media. Our vision is to redefine the traditional music experience - ushering it from the strict formality of the concert hall into the fresh air of contemporary artistic expression and experimentation.

AMP

Amp is a new music group based in New York City that grapples with experimental, electroacoustic, gestural, or situational compositional trends in the context (for the perspective) of a broader musical modernism. Without fixed ensemble, we draw from the rich new music scene in New York to organically develop a few concerts each year, each usually featuring a particular composer or nexus of compositions. More info at www.ampmusic.org.


Please try to make it out to one or both! And don't miss some brand new opera this weekend as well (see below).


Here is Amp at the NYC venue The Tank last year:

Monday, November 01, 2010

Concert for 24 Hour Opera Project by Atlanta Opera

The concert for Atlanta Opera's 24 Hour Concert will be this Sunday (11/7) at 7:30pm at Georgia State University's Kopleff Recital Hall. The concert is free and open to the public.

Composers will begin work on Saturday (11/6) at 5pm, working with the librettist, stage director, singers, and pianists. The teams are formed by the Atlanta Opera at 5pm on Saturday. The Atlanta Opera will also reveal some other items to be included in the new operas.

Should be a fun ride!

Saturday, October 30, 2010

neoPhonia New Music Ensemble: November 9, 2010

Date: Tuesday, November 9, 2010
Time: 7:30 PM
Location: Kopleff Recital Hall

Join us for Rites of Passage, the second concert of the 2010/11 season! We are honored to feature special guest performers Ken LONG (clarinet) and Brandt FREDRIKSEN (piano) in a program of clarinet music written by Donald ERB, Nickitas DEMOS and Paul OSTERFIELD. The concert is FREE and there will be, as usual, a reception following! Hope to see many of you there!

Program:

OSTERFIELD / Six Vignettes for solo clarinet

ERB / Changes for clarinet & keyboards

DEMOS / Tonoi III for solo clarinet

ERB / Woody for solo clarinet

DEMOS / Rites of Passage (premiere) for clarinet (tripling on bass clarinet, Eb clarinet) & piano

Friday, October 29, 2010

Bent Frequency TONIGHT (10/29)

Sorry we neglected to post this VERY IMPORTANT show - hopefully you've been checking the GSU calendar and/or facebook invites! This was snowed out TWICE last year, so please make a good showing for BF!

Mauricio Kagel: Film Music, Music Performance, Performance Film
Featuring Bent Frequency
Friday, October 29, 2010 - 7:30 PM
Kopleff Recital Hall, GSU
FREE!

Mauricio Kagel, the German-Argentine composer who died in 2008, is most noted for his theatrical contributions to classical music performance. The evening will offer two of Kagel's short films, Unter Strom and Antithese, and performances of Kagel's Schattenklange for bass clarinet and Match for Two Cellos and Percussion. Match is a dialogue for two celli with a percussionist serving as the umpire. It is not only a match in sounds, but also in physical reactions, keeping the umpire busy! Sponsored by the Center for Collaborative and International Arts (CENCIA), which brings together creative writers, visual arts, composers, musicians, actors and playwrights, filmmakers and scholars engaged in arts-related research at Georgia State.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Press Release: Composer Brian Skutle Goes "Beyond the Infinite" for his Fourth Album

A decade after its first conception, and 42 years after the film that inspired it, Atlanta-area filmmaker-composer Brian Skutle is proud to release his fourth album, "Beyond the Infinite: A Musical Odyssey".

In 1999, Skutle was a student at Georgia State University when he composed "Beyond the Infinite," a 3 1/2 minute work inspired by the music of Gyorgy Ligeti and the cinema of Stanley Kubrick as it collided in the landmark 1968 film "2001: A Space Odyssey", and the musical seed that would grow into the album of the same name. Adapted from the short story "The Sentinel" by Arthur C. Clarke, "2001" was an ambitious film that tracked man's evolution in intelligence and technology back from the "dawn of man" to the early 21st Century, when the crew of Discovery One is sent to explore a mysterious signal that was directed towards Jupiter from an artifact on the moon. With Oscar-winning visual effects and limitless imagination, Kubrick's iconoclastic sci-fi film has confounded and enthralled audiences ever since its first release during the "space race" of the late '60s.

Skutle was one of those both confounded and enthralled by the film. As he wrote in his 2002 review, "But like the finest cinematic mind-benders, the more times you watch, the more the underlying meaning and form of Kubrick’s film reveals itself...whether you see it as a spiritual epic or pretentious bore, '2001' is a landmark of special effects and sound design." It wasn't just the sights that engaged him: Kubrick's use of classical music to score the action also imprinted itself on Skutle; that and the knowledge of an unused score by Alex North gave him the idea for "Beyond the Infinite."

As he writes in the liner notes for the album, "Conceived in part as an 'alternative soundtrack' to '2001' as much as it is a tone poem, 'Beyond the Infinite' takes its cues, on a musical level, as much from Alex North's elegant, unusued score for '2001' as much as it does the collection of Ligeti, J. Strauss, R. Strauss, and Khachaturian Kubrick used in his epic. The goal was to meld the tonal continuity of North's music with the experimental amalgam of Kubrick's chosen selections...So you have waltz-like works performed by synthesized sounds instead of strings, motifs performed in both chamber and electronic configurations, and pieces that carry a more traditional music structure programmed next to ones of a more avant garde nature."

In the spirit of his conception of "Beyond the Infinite" as an alternative soundtrack to the film, Brian Skutle has chosen an original approach to releasing the album. In addition to being available for purchase at online retailers such as CDBaby and iTunes (along with his other three albums- "Creative Beginnings", "Dark Experiments", and "Sonic Visions of a New Old West"), Skutle has created a special commentary for "2001: A Space Odyssey" which places the pieces of "Beyond the Infinite" in context of the moments in the film they were inspired by, along with newly-recorded commentary that goes in depth onto not only his thoughts on the film itself, but also the creation of "Beyond the Infinite: A Musical Odyssey." Downloadable from www.sonic-cinema.com, the track allows for a new experience in watching the film, as well as gives voice to an artist and critic with a lot to say as both about this singular work of art.

Thanks for listening,

Brian Skutle
www.sonic-cinema.com
www.reverbnation.com/brianskutle
www.myspace.com/brianskutle
www.myspace.com/cinemanouveau
www.youtube.com/bskutle
Sonic Cinema Shop
"Creative Beginnings" at CDBaby
"Dark Experiments" at CDBaby
"Sonic Visions of a New Old West" at CDBaby
"Beyond the Infinite: A Musical Odyssey" at CDBaby

Friday, October 22, 2010

Cerberus Percussion Group @ Red Light Cafe 11/19/10

Hi everyone -

Cerberus Percussion Group is playing the Red Light Cafe at 9PM on Friday, 11/19/10. Alt-country/folk acts EB Reece (GSU student!) and Adam Klein open at 7:30 and 8:00, respectively.

On the program:
Catfish - Mark Applebaum
Pachamama - Adam Scott Neal
The Frame Problem - James Romig
Attica - Frederic Rzewski


Admission is $7, but supporting contemporary music is priceless.


Feel free to RSVP via facebook here.


Program Notes:

Catfish (2003) - Intense, but always with a sick Californian sense of humor, Catfish is a vexing and delightful listening experience. -John Zorn

Pachamama (2009) is a piece for percussion trio. Each player has a 'melodic' instrument (conch shell, ocarina, melodica), some kind of drum (up to them), another 'rhythmic' percussion instrument (shaker, stones, log drum) and an 'atmospheric' instrument (frog guiro, box of pebbles, paper and plastic bags).The form is based on a 9x9 magic square. The number in each square determined the number of measures (in 4/4) that each instrument, dynamic, or rhythmic pattern would last. It will sound a lot less arbitrary than that description. What to listen for, in a nutshell - different instruments will come and go. They will gradually fall into a groove, the groove may become less apparent, then appear again. If you listen closely, you may notice that each player is actually in his own meter. -Adam Scott Neal

The Frame Problem (2003) The title refers to a primary difficulty in designing robots and computer programs with "artificial intelligence." Human brains have a remarkable ability to "frame" information: in an instant, we are able to observe and organize an enormous amount of data, sorting and categorizing what is relevant and what is not. When listening to music, one of the primary hierarchical "frames" we create is that of meter. In this percussion trio, multiple distinct meters occur concurrently—in different lines, at constantly shifting dynamic levels, and in different timbral aggregations—providing human listeners with the opportunity to resolve multiple overlapping “frames” simultaneously. Robots in the audience will probably just be confused. -James Romig

Attica (1972), the earliest work on tonight’s program, is also one of Rzewski’s earliest compositions to feature an overtly political message. A lush repetitive tonal sequence is punctuated by a narrator’s intoned text, gradually expanding one word at a time; the sequenced is derived from a statement made by Richard X. Clark, one of the organizers of the 1971 Attica prison uprising, upon his release in February 1972: “Attica is in front of me.” Although Attica is being presented on its own this evening, it was originally conceived as a companion piece to the more visceral Coming Together, whose narration is based on the words of a less fortunate Attica inmate, radical antiwar activist Sam Melville (“Mad Bomber” Melville), who was killed by police during the uprising. -Kyle Gann

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

neoPhonia concert review

Review of neoPhonia New Music Ensemble: October 19, 2010

I hesitate to call this a review because I'm not a professional journalist and I'm only going to say a few words of my impressions of the evening. For a critic's review, please see Pierre Ruhe's write-up on ArtsCriticATL.com.

This concert, which began the 16th season of neoPhonia, was an evening of three Atlanta native composers--Charles Knox, Mark Gresham, and Brent Milam. Charles Knox, born 1929, is our 'founding father', the oldest and most mature composer living and working in the Atlanta area. This concert was largely in honor of Mr. Knox. The evening was framed by his works, both the first and last pieces written by him. And a few words were said in his honor by Dwight Coleman, who spoke of working with Knox on an opera [could someone who knows more please provide details] and of Knox's 45-year relationship with the School of Music.

All composers were in attendance. It was greet to meet and chat with them before and after the show.

Following is the program with some of my notes...

KNOX / Song & Double (1984) for oboe & piano
All I wrote for this one was "beautiful". ;)

GRESHAM / Vagabond Drumming, Book IV (2010 - premiere) for percussion duo
Excellent and perhaps my favorite of the pieces in Gresham's Vegabond Drumming series.
Made use of blocks, bongos, snare, tamborine, cymbals and chimes. The blocks started together and then the percussion combined in different ways. The third movement was polyrhythmic, the fourth seemed Asian inspired with the pentatonic pitched blocks, the fifth got louder with snare, bongos, and blocks. I think Mark was very pleased with this performance, as he should be, it was great.

MILAM / Between The Walls (2010 - premiere) for flute, Bb clarinet, cello & piano
Great work. The first movement started off softly dissonant, but stayed light and went into jazzy playfulness. The second movement was soft and gentle. The third and most memorable to me started playfully pizzicato and pointillistic and gradually got more intense, melodic, and dense, a disintegration process in reverse. Very cool!

GRESHAM / Genshi (2010 - premiere) for Bb clarinet & viola
This was a beaufiful piece with much counterpoint, sometimes chasing, sometimes opposing. The clarinet and viola were in continual play with one another. I heard some intonation issues in the viola in several parts. I don't think the microtones were intended ;), but it did not take away from the beauty and delightfulness of the piece.

KNOX / The Framing Of This Circle (1999) for horn, violin & piano
WOW! This was the powerhouse of the evening. I don't have words to describe it. You just have to find a recording of it (if there is one; I hope there is!) and hear it for yourself. Swept me up, heart and soul. This was a fitting finale and brought the whole concert (which was already great to begin with) to a grand conclusion. This was absolutely the most mature piece on the program, which is not surprising given that Knox has decades on us in composing experience. : ) The instrumentation was a perfect union. The writing was in perfect relationship. Amazing piece!

Btw, here's the #neophonia Twitter feed with what I tweeted from the show (in between pieces, of course!)

Anyone else who was there, please feel free to add your comments.

Saturday, October 16, 2010

iPad Concert idea

I'm thinking of putting together an iPad concert where each participant composes and performs a work in an app of their choosing.

There are many apps to choose from.

Here are some of my favorites:

  • Beatwave
  • JamPad
  • KORG iELECTRIBE
  • A Noise Machine HD
  • PatternMusic
  • PolyRhythms
  • Reactable
  • Tiction AV
  • Zen Sound

    Would anyone like to join me in composing iPad pieces and putting on a show?
  • Tuesday, October 12, 2010

    Curtis Bryant - Atlanta Faith Partners Concert - October 17

    October 17, 2010 – Sunday, 4:00 PM, FAITH PARTNERS FINAL CONCERT. A joint performance of all programs from Curtis Bryant's Atlanta Faith Partners Residency sponsored by the American Composers Forum will be held at First Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Georgia. Choirs and instrumentalists from three Atlanta congregations, Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, Cathedral of Christ the King, and First Presbyterian Church will participate in the concert. Featured works include the complete "Redeemer Evening Prayer – A Lenten Vespers," including the "Prelude and Postlude: Fugue and Toccata on FA-SOL-LA RE" for organ solo, "I Lift My Eyes" (Psalm 121), "Canticle of Mary" and "Canticle of Simeon," and two Glorias. Two additional psalm settings for choir and organ, "How Long, O God" and "I Sing of Light," as well as the "Hymn of Wisdom" for choir with brass quintet, organ and percussion will be featured. The vocal works on the program include original lyrics by four different poets with ties to Atlanta: William Allen, Stephen Bluestone, Doug Cumming and Marcia King. The St. Cecilia Consort will also give a repeat performance of Bryant's "Fantasy on Divinum Mysterium" for orchestra. ADMISSION IS FREE!

    Sunday, October 10, 2010

    GSU Bands with world premiere by Tim Jansa - October 21, 2010

    Big new music week at GSU - neoPhonia on Tuesday and this concert on Thursday:


    During the inaugural concert of the 2010/2011 season, Robert J. Ambrose will lead internationally renowned euphonium soloist Adam Frey and the Georgia State University Symphonic Wind Ensemble in the world premiere performance of "Concierto Ibérico" for solo euphonium and concert band by local German-American composer Tim Jansa. This is a large-scale symphonic work of almost 28 minutes in length and built around 3 major festivals of Spain: The Festival of San Fermin in Pamplona, the Semana Santa, and the Fallas of Valencia.

    This work was named a finalist for the 2010 Harvey G. Phillips Award for Compositional Excellence.

    The performance will take place on Thursday, October 21, at 7:30 pm at the Rialto Center for the Arts. Admission is free.

    The Symphonic Wind Ensemble will also present works by McAllister, Stravinsky and Bach. The Wind Orchestra will perform works by Whitacre, Grainger, Persichetti and Goldman.

    Robert J. Ambrose & Chester Phillips, conductors
    Tim Ellison, graduate assistant conductor
    Adam Frey, euphonium

    More info can be found at http://www.music.gsu.edu/events.aspx and at http://www.timjansa.com/works/concierto-iberico-2009

    Friday, October 08, 2010

    neoPhonia New Music Ensemble: October 19, 2010

    When: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 - 7:30 PM
    Where: Kopleff Recital Hall - Free Admission

    Join us as we begin our 16th Season with a concert entitled Red Clay Connections. The evening will feature music by Atlanta based composers Mark GRESHAM, Charles KNOX & Brent MILAM. Please also plan on meeting the composers and performers after the performance at a reception sponsored by the GSU Student Chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc.

    PROGRAM:

    KNOX / Song & Double for oboe & piano
    GRESHAM / Vagabond Drumming, Book IV (premiere) for percussion duo
    MILAM / Between The Walls (premiere) for flute, Bb clarinet, cello & piano
    GRESHAM / Genshi (premiere) for Bb clarinet & viola
    KNOX / The Framing Of This Circle for horn, violin & piano

    Wednesday, September 22, 2010

    Composer & Flutist Robert Cronin in Concert!

    Flutist and Composer Robert Cronin will be doing a recital on Tuesday, October 5th at 8:00PM at Kennesaw State University in the Bailey Performing Arts Center. The concert consists entirely of works written by Mr. Cronin himself, including two brand new pieces for flute(s) and harp, Portraits for piccolo and Piano, Postcard for Piccolo and Marimba, Off the Wall for Flute and Piano, a bassoon and trumpet duet as well as part of a solo cello sonata. Other performers include Christina Smith, Tom Hooten, Laura Najarian, Peter Marshall and Ellen Foster. The concert is free and no tickets are required. More information about the works to be performed can be found at www.robertcronin.net.

    Wednesday, September 15, 2010

    Sonic Generator Concert

    Georgia Tech’s chamber music ensemble-in-residence, Sonic Generator, kicks off its fifth anniversary season with a free concert at the Reinsch-Pierce Family Auditorium at the Georgia Tech College of Architecture on Thursday, October 7, 2010 at 8 p.m. The concert features compositions by Randall Woolf, Jonathan Kramer, Karlheinz Essl, Gene Pritsker, Jesper Nordin, and Nathan Davis.

    More information at http://www.sonicgenerator.gatech.edu. Hope to see you there!

    Monday, September 13, 2010

    24-Hour Opera Project by Atlanta Opera

    Saturday November 06, 2010
    Sunday November 07, 2010

    Calling area composers, lyricists, stage directors and opera singers! The opera world is full of drama, intrigue, romance, comedy, and tragedy – how about experiencing all of those things in 24 hours?!?! In celebration of OPERA America’s National Opera Week, opera organizations educational programs in the Metro Atlanta area will be hosting a 24-Hour Opera Project. Think of it as a creative science project where Verdi meets reality TV!



    Composers, lyricists, stage directors and opera singers from all over may apply to join in the project. Composers and lyricists selected to participate will be randomly paired together and will have 12 hours to write an opera! At the end of 12 hours, the pieces will be assigned to participating stage directors, who will draft singers from a pool of applicants and have 8 hours to rehearse before presenting the pieces on a showcase concert 12 hours after the project begins! It’s a whirlwind of music and drama!

    Who can participate?
    Composers, lyricists, stage directors, and singers may apply (experience required).

    Download the appropriate application:

    Composer Application (PDF)

    Lyricist Application (PDF)

    Singer Application (PDF)

    Stage Director Application (PDF)

    What are we talking about?
    We’re talking about opera insanity! 24 hours to compose, rehearse, and perform an opera with strangers. Prizes will be awarded following the showcase concert in the following categories: Best Use of Props, Most Diva-liscious, Best Death Scene, and Best Overall Composition.


    Where will the event take place?
    The 24-Hour Opera Project will take place on the campus of Georgia State University.

    When will this happen?
    November 6-7, 2010

    Why are we subjecting ourselves to such madness?
    Because we’re crazy! (And we want everyone to see how cool opera is!)

    Still have questions?
    Please contact The Atlanta Opera education department at 404.881.8801 or education@atlantaopera.org.

    The Fine Print:
    Compositions must 7-10 minutes in length, written and performed in English and scored for 4 singers (soprano/mezzo/tenor/bass) with piano, and composed around a specific themed (top secret until November 6!). Pre-existing compositions will not be eligible. Composition teams will be paired randomly, compositions will be assigned to stage directors randomly, and participating singers will be selected to perform through a “live” singer draft. Submission of application in any category does not guarantee participation and artists may only apply in one discipline; Applicants selected to participate will be notified by October 25.



    Monday, August 23, 2010

    Mark your calendars for September 17th!

    Dear Readers,

    I am happy to announce TWO concerts of contemporary music happening on Friday, September 17th. They overlap slightly, but there is a good chance you can make it to both. I strongly urge you to support contemporary music in Atlanta by attending at least one of these concerts.

    Concert 1:
    Atlanta/Nürnberg: Sister Cities in Concert
    Featuring Bent Frequency
    Friday, September 17, 2010 - 7:30 PM

    This concert of Nürnberg and Atlanta-based composers will include works by Vivienne Olive and Dieter Buwen (Nürnberg) and Tim Jansa, Nick Demos and Robert Scott Thompson (GSU, Atlanta). Sponsored by the Center for Collaborative and International Arts (CENCIA), which brings together creative writers, visual arts, composers, musicians, actors and playwrights, filmmakers and scholars engaged in arts-related research at Georgia State.

    Venue: Rialto Center for the Arts
    Cost: FREE


    Concert 2:
    Cerberus Percussion Group + Darren Nelsen
    Friday, September 17, 2010 - 9:00 PM



    Cerberus Percussion Group (Drew Dolan, Caleb Herron, Brandon Dodge - joined by Adam Scott Neal, keyboards) is performing at Kavarna. The program will include:

    Adam Scott Neal - Pachamama (premiere)
    Frederic Rzewski - Les Moutons de Panurge
    Louis Andriessen - Workers Union
    Mark Applebaum - Catfish

    And more!

    Composer-guitarist Darren Nelsen will be opening.
    Venue: Kavarna
    Cost: FREE

    Tuesday, August 03, 2010

    Two Passions Collide: A Movie Review & A Musical Journey

    Hello Atlanta Composers. It's been a while since I've posted on here. Today I took the first steps towards releasing my fourth album by taking my love of movies and melding it with my creative expressions. If you click on the title (or here) you'll find my newly-released fan commentary of Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey." When synched with the film, however (starting at the first use of Ligeti's "Atmospheres" at the beginning), you'll find the tracks of my fourth album- "Beyond the Infinite: A Musical Odyssey"- placed in context to the film itself, with my own observations of creating the album (and discussing the film itself)- in between pieces. The album itself will be released officially in the coming month or so, but for now I'm very pleased to release it in this highly original fashion. I hope you take a listen.

    Thanks for listening,

    Brian Skutle
    www.sonic-cinema.com

    Tuesday, July 27, 2010

    Third Annual Guthman Musical Instrument Competition: Call for Entries

    Submit Entrees Online by October 1st 2010

    Inventors, composers, creators, and designers are encouraged to submit their musical instrument inventions to the 2011 Margaret Guthman Musical Instrument Competition. The event is hosted by the Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology and features a grand prize of $5,000. In total, $10,000 in cash prizes will be awarded to the best novel musical instruments. Entries will be accepted through October 1, 2010 via an Online Submission Form and notification of acceptance will be provided November 1, 2010.

    The competition, which will take place February 24-25 2011, will be judged by an expert panel including Tom Oberheim, inventor of the first polyphonic music synthesizer, Sergi Jorda, inventor of the Reactable tabletop musical instrument, Georgia Tech professor Jason Freeman, and Wired.com music journalist Eliot Van Buskirk. This annual competition is supported by the philanthropic gifts of Tech alum Richard Guthman in honor of his wife Margaret. It showcases new uses of technology to enhance participation in music performance and music creation.

    For more information about previous iterations of the competition, judging criteria, submission format etc. go to our website.

    We are looking forward to receiving your submissions, and please feel free to distribute this information to other interested parties,

    Friday, July 23, 2010

    “Anatomy of a Film Score” seminar with Hummie Mann



    ANNOUNCEMENT: THE SEMINAR HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED! EARLY SIGNUP DISCOUNT IS NOW AVAILABLE. SEE BELOW FOR DETAILS.
    September 25 – 26, 2010
    10 am – 6 pm each day
    At the Nashville Film Institute The Factory, Franklin, Tennessee click here for a map/directions – parking is free for attendees lodging is available in nearby Cool Springs

    The Nashville Composers Association presents the two-day seminar “Anatomy of a Film Score” with two-time Emmy-award winning composer/arranger Hummie Mann. Hummie has collaborated with some of Hollywood’s most celebrated directors in both theatrical and television films. His motion pictures projects have ranged from Mel Brooks’ “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” to Peter Yates’ “Year of the Comet”, the children’s film “Thomas and the Magic Railroad” to “Wooly Boys” directed by Leszek Burzynski starring Peter Fonda, Kris Kristofferson, Keith Carradine and Joe Mazzello. For television, he has scored projects for Simon Wincer (the miniseries “P.T. Barnum”), Jonathan Kaplan (the miniseries re-make of “In Cold Blood”), Norman Jewison (“Picture Windows – Soir Bleu”), Peter Bogdanovich (“The Rescuers: Tales of Courage – Two Women”), Joe Dante (“Masters of Horror: Homecoming”), Jim Abrahams (“First Do No Harm”), Richard Friedenberg (“Suzanne’s Diary for Nicholas”), William Friedkin, John Milius and Ralph Bakshi (all part of the “Rebel Highway” series of films), among others. Click here for Hummie’s complete credits, and here for his bio.


    Anatomy of a Film Score attendees will receive 50+ pages of scores/notes with a CD of the music studied. Hummie will discuss the process of creating a score from initial concept to finished recorded music using audio and video examples. He will also discuss some specific compositional and technical film scoring techniques utilized in the process. Hummie recommends attendees bring note and manuscript paper as there will be much information you may wish to jot down. Attendees may also submit questions for Hummie ahead of time that he will address as part of the class or during the Q & A segment at the end.


    You will learn, among other things:


    • Where to begin? Establishing a vocabulary and policy for the score.

    • Creating themes and varying them to work in different dramatic situations.

    • Techniques of contracting and expanding phrase lengths to fit a film’s timing requirements.

    • Discussion about various harmonic languages/progressions used in film.

    • The use and control of dissonance for dramatic results.

    • A step by step method of scoring a film from start to finish.

    Read about the quality of Hummie’s teaching and courses here.


    Anatomy of a Film Score attendees will also receive a free one-year Nashville Composers Association membership, worth $50.


    To Register, click here. Seating is limited. Regular enrollment fee: $300 - includes scores and CD.


    EARLY SIGNUP SPECIAL: SIGN UP AND PAY BY AUGUST 28th AT THE DISCOUNTED RATE OF $239.

    Regular enrollment fee applies after August 28th.




    Tuesday, June 29, 2010

    Composer/flutist Lydia Ayers at Georgia Tech

    From Catherine Bull:

    Composer/flutist Lydia Ayers will be in Atlanta on Friday 2 July for a workshop at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the Couch Building Room TBA. The workshop will begin at 2:00 pm.

    There is no charge -- it is free.

    Among Lydia's many compositions, she will be known to many as the composer of "Time's Graffitti: Lucky Calligraphy" which was commissioned by the NFA in 2006 for the High School Soloist Competition.

    Lydia will be dealing with extended techniques and music for flute and computer, and there will also be a presentation on flute and interactive-signal-processing.

    If you wish to attend, please contact Catherine Bull privately at danielspyle@bellsouth.net.

    Saturday, June 12, 2010

    Saturday, June 05, 2010

    Birds of a Feather

    Hold on to your hats. Once again I'm out on the music journalism circuit. —Mark Gresham

    "Last night's performance by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus unveiled a pair of world premieres by composers Jennifer Higdon and Michael Gandolfi, placing them on the front burner ahead of intermission, and leaving one of the core symphonic repertoire's best-known works as a contrail in their wake. … [READ MORE]

    Sunday, May 23, 2010

    All 300 Fine Arts Teachers Laid Off in Detroit

    Has anyone heard about this? It's alarming it would happen in Detroit, I hope this isn't contagious and will spread to other cities such as Atlanta: http://tinyurl.com/2bp6nra

    Wednesday, May 12, 2010

    "Anatomy of a Film Score" seminar - POSTPONED

    The "Anatomy of a Film Score" seminar with Hummie Mann originally scheduled for May 22 - 23 has been postponed due to the Nashville floods.

    We are working on rescheduling for this fall, most likely in September. In the meantime, everyone who has already paid for the seminar will receive a full refund, and everyone who signed up for the originally-scheduled May 22 - 23 event will receive a complimentary one-year NCA membership for the inconvenience.

    We'll make an announcement once the new dates for this seminar is secured. I hope everyone in the Nashville area has come through this deluge safely and dry.

    Geoff Koch, president
    Nashville Composers Association

    Wednesday, May 05, 2010

    “Anatomy of a Film Score” seminar with Hummie Mann in Nashville, TN


    May 22-23, 2010, 10 am to 6 pm

    At the Nashville Film Institute
    The Factory, Franklin, Tennessee
    click here for a map/directions – parking is free for attendees
    lodging is available in nearby Cool Springs

    The Nashville Composers Association presents the two-day seminar “Anatomy of a Film Score” with two-time Emmy-award winning composer/arranger Hummie Mann. Hummie has collaborated with some of Hollywood’s most celebrated directors in both theatrical and television films. His motion pictures projects have ranged from Mel Brooks’ “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” to Peter Yates’ “Year of the Comet”, the children’s film “Thomas and the Magic Railroad” to “Wooly Boys” directed by Leszek Burzynski starring Peter Fonda, Kris Kristofferson, Keith Carradine and Joe Mazzello. For television, he has scored projects for Simon Wincer (the miniseries “P.T. Barnum”), Jonathan Kaplan (the miniseries re-make of “In Cold Blood”), Norman Jewison (“Picture Windows – Soir Bleu”), Peter Bogdanovich (“The Rescuers: Tales of Courage – Two Women”), Joe Dante (“Masters of Horror: Homecoming”), Jim Abrahams (“First Do No Harm”), Richard Friedenberg (“Suzanne’s Diary for Nicholas”), William Friedkin, John Milius and Ralph Bakshi (all part of the “Rebel Highway” series of films), among others. Click here for Hummie’s complete credits, and here for his bio.

    Anatomy of a Film Score attendees will receive 50+ pages of scores/notes with a CD of the music studied. Hummie will discuss the process of creating a score from initial concept to finished recorded music using audio and video examples. He will also discuss some specific compositional and technical film scoring techniques utilized in the process. Hummie recommends attendees bring note and manuscript paper as there will be much information you may wish to jot down. Attendees may also submit questions for Hummie ahead of time that he will address as part of the class or during the Q & A segment at the end.

    Read about the quality of Hummie’s teaching and courses here.

    Anatomy of a Film Score attendees will also receive a free one-year Nashville Composers Association membership, worth $50.

    To Register, click here. Seating is limited.

    Monday, April 26, 2010

    Brian Chamberlain's Graduate Recital on May 2nd

    Sunday, May 2nd, 2010
    3:00 PM
    Florence Kopleff Recital Hall,
    Georgia State University

    Slipping on the Edge of Loss nn. 35, for Solo Piano - Performed by James Walker
    Left to Rust nn. 32, for Tuba and Piano - Performed by Vince Jackson and Huu Mai
    Lost Hollow Road nn. 15, for Flute and Guitar Duet - Performed by: duoATL
    Levee nn. 37, for Flute and Guitar Quartet - Performed by Nicole Chamberlain, Brian Smith and Athens Guitar Trio

    -Intermission-

    Slow Motion Exit nn. 24, for String Quintet
    Ecclesia nn. 39, for Mixed Chamber Ensemble - Performed by: Mercury Season

    Saturday, April 17, 2010

    neoPhonia New Music Ensemble: April 20, 2010

    As part of our year long celebration of our 15th Anniversary Season, we are proud to welcome home some distinguished alumni of the composition program here at Georgia State University. We are also excited to premiere a new work commissioned by the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition.

    Program:

    neoPhonia New Music ensemble
    Nickitas Demos, artistic director

    HOMECOMING

    Special Guest Artist:
    Kenneth LONG, bass clarinet
    Coordinator of Woodwind Studies at the GSU School of Music

    Day: Tuesday, April 20
    Location: Kopleff Recital Hall, downtown Atlanta
    Time: 7:30 PM
    FREE and open to the public!

    Five Movements on Mondrian by GSU alumnus, Adam Scott NEAL
    for video and computer generated sounds

    Corrugated Refrains by Neil THORNOCK
    for solo bass clarinet
    PREMIERE
    Commissioned by the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition and Brigham Young University

    Tranquility by GSU alumna, Kyong Mee CHOI
    for computer generated sounds

    ...y lleno de humildad y amor la adoro by GSU alumnus, Drew DOLAN
    for soprano and string quartet
    PREMIERE

    As always, you can meet and greet the composers and performers at a reception following the concert sponsored by the GSU Student Chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI)!

    Hope to see you there!!

    Wednesday, April 14, 2010

    Somali Radio Stations Halt Music

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/world/africa/14somalia.html?ref=music

    This is one of the saddest and most infuriating things I've ever heard.

    How can this happen in the 21st century? How can human beings be so unenlightened?

    Though this is not an Atlanta story, it should give us all pause. We should be grateful that we can listen to music, much less compose it. We'd probably be killed for that in Somalia. Freakin' bastards.

    Jennifer Higdon wins the Pulitzer (and a Grammy!)

    Jennifer Higdon won the Pulitzer Prize for Music on Monday. A few months ago, she won a Grammy. Jennifer lived here till she was 10, so I think that qualifies her as an Atlanta Composer. ;) She's also been commissioned by the Atlanta Symphony and is premiering a new work here with eighth blackbird in June.

    Mark Gresham wrote a piece on her a while back. I think it was for her 'Atlanta' piece, City Scapes. (Mark, do you want to post a link to that?)

    Congratulations, Jennifer!

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2010/04/composer-jennifer-higdon-wins-pulitzer-for-violin-concerto.html

    Friday, April 09, 2010

    Guest artist Elliot Z. Levine, composer/vocalist

    Choral music by Elliot Levine–Jewish and Christian sacred pieces and secular works
    Athens Chamber Singers, Kevin Kelly, Director
    and Elliot Z. Levine, Baritone
    in the premiere of Flame Language for chamber ensemble by Laurence Sherr
    Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 8:00 p.m.
    Dr. Bobbie Bailey & Family Performance Center
    Kennesaw State University
    Free and open to the public
    Further info: 770-423-6650 | boxoffice@kennesaw.edu

    Other announcements
    KSU Student Composition Concert

    Thursday, March 11, 2010

    Sonic Generator Concert at the High Museum

    Sonic Generator's final concert of the 2009-2010 season, "The Body Machine," explores the physicality and spirituality of the human condition and features compositions by John Luther Adams, Eve Beglarian, Edmund Campion, Mario Diaz de León, Jason Rohrer, and Jacob ter Veldhuis.

    Wednesday, March 31st, 2010 at 8 p.m.
    Hill Auditorium, High Museum of Art, 1280 Peachtree Street
    http://www.sonicgenerator.gatech.edu
    http://www.facebook.com/event.php?invites&eid=360817707091

    Tickets are $10 and since seating is limited, advance purchase is strongly recommended. Tickets are available from the Woodruff Center box office by phone (404-733-5000), in person (1280 Peachtree Street), or online.

    Saturday, February 13, 2010

    Emory Arts cancels Saturday Jazzfest event (2/13)

    This latest word in on event closings from Emort Arts:

    This is to advise you that tonight’s (2/13, 8 p.m.) Emory Big Band concert has also been canceled due to snowy and icy conditions on the Emory campus.

    For weather updates and closings on the Emory University campus call the Emory Inclement Weather Hotline, 404-727-1234, for the latest official announcements.

    Thank you,

    Jessica Moore

    --
    Communications Coordinator, Center for Creativity & Arts
    Emory Coca-Cola Artist in Residence Program Development Specialist
    Arts at Emory
    Schwartz Center for Performing Arts
    1700 N. Decatur Rd.
    Atlanta, GA 30322

    Friday, February 12, 2010

    Emory Jazz Festival cancels Friday events; Saturday still scheduled with an eye on weather

    This notice to reporters and editors just received from Emory Arts:

    This is to advise you that today’s (2/12) 3:30 p.m. rhythm section masterclass and the 8:00 p.m. Jazz Festival concert featuring John Clayton have been canceled due to inclement weather.

    Tomorrow, Sat., Feb. 13’s 8:00 p.m. concert with the Emory Big Band is still scheduled to proceed until further notice.

    For weather updates and closings on the Emory University campus call the Emory Inclement Weather Hotline, 404-727-1234, for the latest official announcements.


    Thank you,

    Jessica Moore

    --
    Communications Coordinator, Center for Creativity & Arts
    Emory Coca-Cola Artist in Residence Program Development Specialist
    Arts at Emory
    Schwartz Center for Performing Arts
    1700 N. Decatur Rd.
    Atlanta, GA 30322

    Tonight's "Maurico Kagel" event cancelled

    This evening's presentation of "Mauricio Kagel: Film Music, Music Performance, Performance Film" by Bent Frequency in conjunction with Georgia State University's Center for Collaborative and International Arts (CENCIA) has been canceled due to weather. (GSU has officially closed for the day. The event was to have taken place tonight at 8pm in Kopleff Recital Hall.) Here's the official cancellation notice from CENCIA, received by e-mail:

    Dear Patron,

    It is with regret that I must inform you that we are canceling tonight's
    concert of Mauricio Kagel film and music. Georgia State University has
    closed its offices and buildings as of noon today in anticipation of the
    inclement weather coming to Atlanta. We regard your safety as very
    important so we respect the University's decision.

    However, this is an important event to us and we will work to reschedule
    it as soon as we can. When the new date and time are known, we will be
    sure to contact you.

    Mauricio Kagel's work asks us to smile and laugh at the human condition.
    So, we are choosing to find the humor in the events of today and our
    approaching snow storm. We hope that you spend this evening in good
    company and safely off the roads.

    Jen Waters
    Associate to the Director
    CENCIA

    Wednesday, February 03, 2010

    Jennifer Higdon wins Grammy

    As usual, the niche "classical" categories were not nationally televised in this year's Grammy Awards ceremonies. But as reported in NewMusicBox the next day, Jennifer Higdon's Percussion Concerto received the 2010 Grammy for Best Classical Contemporary Composition. Jennifer spent the first 10 years of her life growing up in Atlanta, near Lenox Square, connected by family to the then-new Memorial Arts Center scene (now known as Woodruff Arts Center) in the heart of Midtown, long before the Haight-Ashbury-like 14th Street west of Peachtree gave way to shiny, antiseptic offices and skyscrapers. (Ask Jen about the big rubber Jesus sometime.)

    Read the article about Jen's Grammy win in NewMusicBox: http://www.newmusicbox.org/article.nmbx?id=6258

    Wednesday, January 13, 2010

    Sonic Generator Concert with Michael Gordon

    Georgia Tech’s chamber music ensemble-in-residence, Sonic Generator, will feature the music of resident composer Michael Gordon in a free performance on Monday, February 8th at 8 p.m. at the Rich Theatre at the Woodruff Arts Center.

    Most readers of this blog already know Gordon's music through his association with Bang on a Can and his fascinating collaborations with filmmaker Bill Morrison. We're delighted to be bringing Michael down to Atlanta and to be sharing his music with you.

    Full details on our web site: http://www.sonicgenerator.gatech.edu

    Hope to see you there!

    Tuesday, January 05, 2010

    Cobb Symphony Premieres Works by Two Atlanta Composers

    This Saturday (1/9) at 8pm the Cobb Symphony will premiere works by two Atlanta Composers, Jen Mitchell and Robert Cronin.

    Inspired by the works of Brian Froud, "The Pond" by Jen Mitchell is a ballet loosely based on the Grimm's fairy tale, "The Nix in the Pond." This suite is extracted from Act II. In Act I, a maiden plays her flute in the forest and enchants a prince as he hunts. They immediately fall in love. Act II opens with the prince hunting alone in the forest. Having overheard the maidens tune, an evil water sprite plays the tune and lures the prince into her pond. The maiden is drawn to the pond with the help of forest fairies and sees the prince trapped under the water sprite's spell. She and the water sprite battle for the prince by playing their flutes, but the maiden breaks the prince from the water sprite's spell and they flee. In Act III, the maiden and the prince have a forest wedding and celebrate with the forest fairies. The evil water sprite asks for forgiveness and bestows gifts upon the newlyweds, and they all rejoice together.

    Robert Cronin, flutist for the Atlanta Symphony, will have his work "Concerto for Flute and Orchestra" premiered as well. His wife, Christina Smith also flutist for the Atlanta Symphony, will be the soloist. The work is in two movements, and in Christina's own words is "very exciting and lyrical. Can't wait to play it!".

    Seems like it will be a flutastic night!